Ronald Reagan’s Tear Down This Wall Speech

Aug 12th, 2013 posted by admin

On August 28, 1963, before a crowd of thousands who had come to Washington, D.C. to march on behalf of civil rights for black Americans, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered one of the best-known speeches of his life. Remembered as the “I Have a Dream Speech” the purpose of the sixteen minute address was to appeal to the nation’s conscience and to inspire and encourage those involved in the struggle for civil rights to keep on working courageously despite all opposition. King’s courageous work for peace and justice is remembered annually each February when we honor his memory, but the speech is worth listening to in its entirety at any time of the year. King honed his oratory skills as a Baptist preacher, and his compelling voice, TV savings, increasing in passionate intensity as the speech progresses, rings out with hope. The speech, appropriately delivered near the Lincoln Memorial, contains memorable lines, including: “I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” This line comes within a litany of phrases, each beginning with “I have a dream.”

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Jimmy Carter’s Crisis of Confidence Speech

May 19th, 2013 posted by admin

Jimmy Carter’s crisis of confidence speech is often referred to as the “malaise” speech, although he never actually used that word in his speech. The President originally wanted to devote his fifth major speech to the growing energy crisis, but had a change of heart after a week of meetings at Camp David. Leading figures from the government, academia and clergy made him realize that the American people no longer listened or cared. The Vietnam War and Watergate scandal had soured their view of politics, and Carter decided to take a different approach.

On July 15th, 1979, instead of talking about (more…)

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George W. Bush’s Address to the Nation on September 11

Apr 2nd, 2013 posted by admin

On the night of September 11, 2001, President George W. Bush addressed the United States and the world from the Oval Office. In this brief, now-famous speech, Bush reviewed what officials knew at that point about the devastating 9/11 terrorist attacks.

We all remember those moments and watching them on TV all day. We relive that day every year on the anniversary. Packages from Here include the biggest news networks that keep those lost on that day forever in our hearts and memories.

President Bush’s address began by describing how thousands of victims, everyday people, lost their lives that morning, and at the same time how the terrorists failed to accomplish their true mission: to bring about chaos and to weaken the nation’s resolve. Bush went on to describe America’s initial response to the attacks, including the heroism of the rescue workers and the many people who donated blood across the country. And he made clear that government agencies and private businesses would be open the following day.

The next part of the speech concerned the nation’s future response to the attacks. Bush explained that American intelligence and law enforcement would find and punish those behind the plot, and that the international community supported the United States in the fight against terrorism.

Bush concluded by asking for prayers, quoting Scripture and assuring viewers that America would continue to “defend freedom.” The final three words were “God bless America.”

A couple elements particularly stand out. One is that the term “al-Qaeda” did not appear in the text of this address. That is because government officials had not yet conclusively linked that terrorist group to the attacks. Second, one line of the speech proved especially important, the most consequential line of the speech. It offered a rationale for American military action for years to come, including the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the overall War on Terror. In this sentence, Bush said America would not distinguish between terrorists and those who “harbor” terrorists. Some people would even label that concept as the Bush Doctrine.

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Dwight D Eisenhower’s D-Day Speech

Mar 23rd, 2013 posted by admin

Before he was the 34th president of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower was a five-star general. During World War II, he was responsible for commanding the Allied forces in their invasion of Normandy. The first landings in Normandy, known as the D-Day invasion, took place on June 6, 1944.

Just before the invasion took place, Eisenhower delivered a speech to the “soldiers, sailors and airmen” of the Allied forces. Like many historic speeches, it was brief (more…)

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JFK’s Rice Stadium Moon Speech

Jun 14th, 2012 posted by admin

John F. Kennedy, 35th President of the United States, gave a speech on September 12, 1962 that was instrumental in the space race. The now famous Rice Stadium speech at Rice University in Houston, Texas was a rousing call to arms for space exploration. In this groundbreaking speech, JFK spoke in depth on how far mankind has come in its scientific knowledge. The President compared the advancements over the past 50,000 years to the vast strides made in the preceding 50 years and the fast pace (more…)

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Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address

Jun 13th, 2012 posted by admin

The Gettysburg Address was a short, 2-minute speech delivered by President Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863, during the U.S. Civil War. The speech was part of a dedication ceremony at the Solders’ National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The President predicted his words would not be remembered by the world. On the contrary, the words of the Gettysburg Address have endured through generations, and the speech is one of the most famous and often-quoted speeches in the history of the United States.

In the speech, President Lincoln refers (more…)

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Malcolm X The ballot or the Bullet Speech

Jun 11th, 2012 posted by admin

Malcolm X was a proponent of civil rights for all people regardless of their race. One of the landmark speeches that he gave on this topic was “The Ballot or the Bullet Speech.” It was given April 3, 1964 in Cleveland, Ohio. In this speech he announced that he would be separating from the Nation of Islam because religion was just another issue that was destroying the unity of African-Americans. The Nation of Islam was an African-American nationalist group that (more…)

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JFK on the Separation of Church and State

Jun 10th, 2012 posted by admin

The separation of church and state is a long held American belief, and one which the founding fathers were careful to put into the Bill of Rights. However, there have always been people who have pushed against that barrier, or who have been afraid that other people might push against it. John Kennedy, the first Catholic president that we’d had, was one example. Some Americans were convinced that, as a Catholic, Kennedy would simply follow the directives of the pope when governing (more…)

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Martin Luther King’s I have a Dream Speech

Jun 9th, 2012 posted by admin

On August 28, 1963, before a crowd of thousands who had come to Washington, D.C. to march on behalf of civil rights for black Americans, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered one of the best-known speeches of his life. Remembered as the “I Have a Dream Speech” the purpose of the sixteen minute address was to appeal to the nation’s conscience and to inspire and encourage those involved in the struggle for civil rights to keep on working courageously despite all opposition.

King’s courageous work (more…)

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